Board of Directors

Member

Jeff Weyant
He/Him/His

A native of Baltimore and Philadelphia, PA, Jeff grew up in a very close family and has lived in Palm Springs full-time for the past 12 years with Marty, his life partner of 32 years (husband for the past 8 years) and his Mom, who moved here. Jeff met his husband in graduate school at Loyola University, Chicago where he attained a masters degree in Philosophy from Loyola & Fordham Universities  with a focus on aesthetics.  Five years ago he started Jeff Weyant Design, INC., focusing on architectural renovations and additions, interior design, and art curation and has received Modernism Week’s award for adaptive re-use of an historical building for the restoration and renovation of Donald Wexler’s 415 Building. Previously, Jeff spent a career as an Art and Design/Product & Business Development Director for at first a boutique and then for an international visual merchandising company.

A founding member and leader of Gifted and Called LGBTQ Catholics and a member of St. Theresa’s Parish Council, Jeff is a passionate advocate for LGBTQ equality and justice in the Church and with husband Marty established the Weyant-Massiello Charitable Trust ten years ago, the focus  to improve the quality of life of the marginalized and impoverished through equality and justice driven initiatives and opportunities. They’ve also been benefactors and members of Verbum Dei High School’s (Watts Los Angeles) adopt a student program for ten years and are currently working on the establishment of an LGBTQ+ equity and safe-space program for Verbum Dei young men, most of whom are who are black and brown. Longtime supporters and Ocotillo Club members of The Center, their recent generous donation helped establish The Center Coachella.

In their spare time they love to cook, hang with family and friends, swim, watch movies, attennd operas and travel internationally. Italy is heaven on earth for them. They’re keen art lovers and collectors with a primary focus on brutalist sculpture, Japanese woodblock prints, and mid-century porcelain.

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